Reviews of Attainable Hi-Fi & Home-Theater Equipment


Reviews of Attainable Hi-Fi & Home-Theater Equipment

  • SoundStage! Shorts - Livio Cucuzza on Audio Research's Industrial Design (November 2018)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Audio Research Past, Present, and Future (October 2018)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - KEF's New R Series for 2018 (September 2018)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Simaudio Moon 390 Digital/Analog Preamplifier and Streamer (September 2018)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - EISA 2018-2019 Awards Introduction (August 2018)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Simaudio's $118,888 Moon 888 Mono Amplifiers (June 2018)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - Totem's Tribe Tower (May 2018)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Amphion's Three Newest Argon Loudspeakers (April 2018)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - Making the Hegel Mohican CD Player (March 2018)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Estelon Lynx Wireless Intelligent Loudspeaker (March 2018)
  • SoundStage! InSight - McIntosh's Five New Solid-State Integrated Amplifiers (January 2018)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - Amphion's Krypton Loudspeaker (January 2018)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Anthem STR Preamplifier and Power Amplifier (December 2017)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - McIntosh Laboratory MA252 Integrated Amplifier (November 2017)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Hegel H90 and H190 Integrated Amplifiers (October 2017)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - How Hegel's SoundEngine Works (October 2017)
  • SoundStage! InSight  - Estelon History and YB and Extreme Loudspeakers (September 2017)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - What Makes Hegel Different? (August 2017)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - Estelon Extreme Legacy Edition Loudspeaker (July 2017)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Amphion Overview and Technologies (July 2017)
  • SoundStage! Insight - Totem Acoustic Signature One Loudspeaker (June 2017)
  • SoundStage! Encore - The Cowboy Junkies'
  • SoundStage! Shorts -- Anthem's STR Integrated Amplifier (May 2017)
  • SoundStage! Shorts -- Paradigm's Perforated Phase Alignment (PPA) Lenses (March 2017)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Paradigm's Persona 9H Loudspeaker (March 2017)
  • SoundStage! InSight -- Contrasts: Dynaudio's Contour and Focus XD Speaker Lines (February 2017)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - New Technologies in MartinLogan's Masterpiece Series
  • SoundStage! Shorts - Dynaudio/Volkswagen Car Audio (December 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Gryphon Philosophy and the Kodo and Mojo S Speakers (January 2017)
  • SoundStage! Shorts -- What's a Tonmeister? (November 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - AxiomAir N3 Wireless Speaker System (December 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Bang & Olufsen BeoLab 90 (November 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - Gryphon Diablo 120 Integrated Amplifier (October 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Dynaudio History and Driver Technology (October 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - The Story How Gryphon Began (September 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - Devialet History, ADH Technology, and Expert 1000 Pro (September 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - Devialet's Phantom Loudspeakers (August 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - McIntosh Home Theater and Streaming Audio (July 2016)
  • SoundStage! Shorts - McIntosh MC275 Stereo Amplifier (June 2016)
  • SoundStage! InSight - McIntosh History and Autoformer Technology (June 2016)

Deadbeet Records DBR-103
Format: CD

Musical Performance ***1/2
Sound Quality ***1/2
Overall Enjoyment ***1/2

201005_dutchmansEloquent imagery and raw acoustics paint pretty, bluesy ballads on Dutchman’s Curve, David Olney’s April release. The Rhode Island-born singer-songwriter has produced an impressive discography since the early 1970s, and his latest album is a worthy addition. Unafraid to bring nontraditional instruments into the blues realm, Olney invites cellist/violinist David Henry and Jim Hoke on autoharp to throw the listener for a loop on several tracks, and he tries his own skillful hand at the ukulele, which fits in smartly on the opening “Train Wreck” and the loping, sultry “I’ve Got a Lot on My Mind.” “Little Sparrow” offers an oddly country-tinged homage to French chanteuse Edith Piaf, but it somehow hits the mark.

Each song tells an intricate story, and Olney reflects on a variety of subjects, from a 1918 Nashville train wreck that was the worst in American history to Vermeer’s painting “The Girl with the Pearl Earring.” With poetic inspiration from such a wide range of sources, it’s no wonder that his songs have been covered by such artists as Emmylou Harris, Johnny Cash, Linda Ronstadt, and Steve Earle. Each of Olney’s songs bears a saga, a narrative, or a recount of some forgotten piece of history. On “Way Down Deep,” Olney snarls a murky number over a resonating electric slide guitar and beefy baritone and tenor sax. Most of the tracks are originals, with the exception of the Tommy Goldsmith song, “Hey Sha La La La,” and The Flamingos’ “I Only Have Eyes for You,” both soul songs that reveal Olney’s passion for belting out a good “doo wop sh’bop” now and again. Dutchman's Curve is a highly enjoyable album that’s not too serious but is seriously well produced. It’s a thoughtful and intelligent disc that’s rife with pretty riffs and imagery.

Courageous Chicken Music/Nash Vegas Flash CCNF CD 0001
Format: CD

Musical Performance ****1/2
Sound Quality ***1/2
Overall Enjoyment ****

201005_jasonscorcheresA band called Jason and the Scorchers should have energy to burn, and it’s been a while since I’ve heard a longish CD (14 cuts) that never lets up, wallows, or runs out of steam. The country punk-rock band has been around, but Halcyon Times is their first album since 1996. It presents band founders Jason Ringenberg and Warner E. Hodges in the company of a new, energetic rhythm section consisting of bassist Al Collins and the young Swedish drummer Pontus Snibb. The recordings were done live with a studio audience, which might account for some of the infectious spontaneity. The songs are about people, events, and Americana that the band has experienced and then written as bigger than life. Consider this character from the opening of “Moonshine Guy / Releasing Celtic Prisoners”:

And he yells and he roars
Likes the Stones, hates the Doors
Thinks the Beatles sing for girls
He’s a moonshine guy in a six-pack world

The recording is sometimes refined but often deliberately coarse. When the band is really humping, it sets up an appealing and powerfully raucous sound. There’s a short, homemade documentary on their website that shows how a lot of the album was recorded, and it looks like it was as much fun to make as it is to listen to.

Several new releases piqued my interest this month, so I decided to seek out a few that I knew would be good. Before I discuss the music, however, my experience buying it is worth mentioning. Traditional methods of purchasing music are dying quickly. Have you noticed how drastically stores like Borders have whittled their music sections? What used to take up half of the store is now relegated to a tiny corner that offers only a handful of popular titles. Both independent and corporate-owned record stores are closing in droves, and buying music at a physical store is becoming a thing of the past. I’ve certainly been aware of the dire straits the music industry has been in for some time, but I’m still surprised by the state of retail stores.

201004_black_crowesBut the good news is that prices are low. I purchased four new albums (well, technically five, as you’ll see in the first review below) for under $50. Ten years ago, CDs were nearly $20 each. And while I think the transformation of the purchasing experience puts more power in the hands of the artists and more money in the pocket of the consumer, I also miss the satisfaction of buying a physical product instead of a digital download. I like to hold the case in my hand, turn the pages of the liner notes, appreciate the weight of the package, and smile to myself in the mirrored disc, wondering how long it will be before all those elements are as outdated as 8-track tapes and gramophones.

201004_mcphillips_f_nsLin McPhillips 6-6644964442-9
Format: CD

Musical Performance ****
Sound Quality ****1/2
Overall Enjoyment ****

 

Lin McPhillips spent 35 years in the Bay Area singing jazz, and she did a stint in the 1970s and ’80s with the jazz fusion group Solar Plexus, where she used synthesizers and electronics to create wordless vocals, becoming in effect a co-soloist with the other band members. McPhillips, who now resides in the Pacific Northwest, took 20 years off from performing so she could raise a family and teach singing, but she’s returned full force with My Shining Hour, a collection of 11 tracks of traditional vocal jazz.